PIP

E-Flare (Standard Size) HAZMAT APPROVED

Item #: HZ610 Series

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E-Flare Steady-on and Flashing 1 Color with Bright Intensity 8 LED. 

Made by E-Flare (Manuf. Part # 939-HZ610-A/939-HZ610-R)
50

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  • Red
  • Amber

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eFlare HZ610 - Red

More Views

  • eFlare HZ610 - Red
  • eFlare HZ610 - Amber
  • eFlare HZ610 - Off Mode
  • eFlare - Roadside with Rubber Base
  • eFlare - Roadside
  • E-Flare and Rubber Base (BASE SOLD SEPARATE)
  • E-Flare and Magnetic Clip (MAGNETIC CLIP SOLD SEPARATE)

Value Shopping Guide

 

E-Flare Steady-on and Flashing 1 Color, Bright Intensity 8 LED. Designed and built to provide the fastest and easiest way to BE SEEN and BE SAFE!

  • Intensely Bright - Can be seen for over 1/2 mile away without night vision, point fixation and distance judgement problems.
  • Portable - Unit is 8” tall and weighs only one pound, making it easy to carry or store anywhere.
  • Simple To Use - Twist the lens to turn on or off. Place unit(s) around to provide a highly visible warning and safety zone.
  • Durable - Waterproof and dustproof, plus e-Flare will survive a 3-foot drop onto a concrete surface.
  • Double the Safety - Provide safety by ensuring maximum 360° visibility. No risk of fire or explosion, and there are no toxic fumes or residue.
  • Versatile - Easily attaches to belts, clothing, vehicles, traffic cones or signs.
  • E-Flare (Manuf. Part # 939-HZ610-A/939-HZ610-R)

 

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